Posts

Brand Love: how does it translate to business marketing and PR?

, ,

Measuring brand love in consumer marketing is big business.

It probably won’t surprise you to know that Nike for example is loved by 27.5 per cent of all 16 – 24 year olds. Slightly more surprising to learn that 32 per cent of young adults have boycotted a brand in the past year.  The main reasons were due to unethical practices, animal cruelty and poor quality products.

YouthSight, part of YouGov scores a host of brands, with consumer emotions towards them tracked on a scale of 1 to 5,  from love to hate.

Love and hate is important for business PR and marketing too. Almost every business transaction, no matter how “business-like” we try to be, will have an emotional element to it.

Top five levers of brand love for your business brand

 

1. The right endorsement or ambassador

We all look for validation from ‘people like us.’  In the business market, a brand ambassador is a customer.  Other people’s experience of your brand or service is crucial to the decision-making process. Look for case studies and customer recommendations from people or companies whose values are well known or obvious. Their experience should resonate or strike a chord with your target audience

2.  Use the right language

‘Mirroring’ is a classic sign of empathy and love in a human relationship. In consumer marketing it translates into ‘using the right language’.  KFC knew its market well enough to use the right language with its customers during its recent delivery crisis.  Their ad campaign and copy showed humour and personality.  It was right for KFC but it wouldn’t have been right for John Lewis. The right language and tone makes a huge difference.

KFC ad campaign using the right language for its customers

3. Hang out with their friends

Discovery and delight are part of the journey of love.  Your brand or service needs to be found by the right people. Being in the right communication channels – that might mean trade publications; websites; blogs; Instagram feeds; LinkedIn groups;  events; discussion forums and so on – all help you to be found.  Make sure your brand or service can be found in the places where your target audience is looking.

4. Show some love and understanding

As old as time itself, at least in terms of love and marketing.  People buy a solution for their needs, so describe all the benefits you can deliver. Show you understand and appreciate your prospects’ needs and challenges; make sure you don’t list product qualities but instead tell your target audience about the values, feelings or advantages it can give.

5. Make a commitment

“People had fallen a bit out of love with it…” How were people helped to fall in love with Tesco again? With the help of a huge increase in advertising budget.  Tesco increased its ad spend by more than any other food and drink advertiser last year to £73.9m.  (The Grocer “Tesco drives massive comeback”)

You don’t have to spend millions, but you do have to make an effort.  It takes time and effort to get the message and the medium right.  If your brand or service is valuable to you, it’s worth spending money to help others fall in love with it too.

Writing key messages

, ,

A great message can come to you in a flash, or you can work on it for days on end. Here’s some tips to help you with the process of writing key messages.

 

Your key messages can and should change quite often.

Your product or offer might not have changed, but your audience or your market probably has.

It’s especially important to get your messages right now that we’ve entered the era of unreliable reviews and ‘post truth.’

A great way to start is to return to the basic ‘what, why, where, when’ to define your offer.   Then it helps to check your messages against some key factors:

Evidence

What evidence do I have to back up this statement?  This could be market research, product testing, a case study or a client quote.

Target audience

What features or benefits do I need to convey to my different target audiences? What are their concerns or needs that I can meet or help?

Positivity

Am I using positive phrases and actions? A complicated sentence is often perceived as less positive or honest.  Use short sentences with positive convictions.

Understandable

This sounds so obvious as to be silly, but actually you should check –  are you so wrapped up in your product bubble that you’ve adopted marketing speak rather than normal words and sentences?

Writing good, convincing key messages is an art form, like writing a good tweet.  We cite Rob Temple who built his fortune on the twitter feed, followed by the books: “Very British Problems.” 

His tweets look so innocent and funny, like a sudden observation of a moment of awkwardness: but he often takes one whole day to write a tweet.

So if you’ve lost your sense of humour, and are so bogged down writing key messages and PR content that you can’t see the wood for the trees, follow the tips here and take a moment to read this post from the Creative Review about writing protest signs.  I guarantee it will make you smile and refresh your copy writing skills:

“An emergency guide to writing protest signs”